Archive for democrats

A Look at the Government Shutdown

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , on October 6, 2013 by Cannon

Byron York has some information on the shutdown.  Maybe it’s more of a semi-shutdown.  To wit:

I asked a Republican source on the Senate Budget Committee for an estimate. This was the answer: “Based on estimates drawn from CBO and OMB data, 83 percent of government operations will continue. This figure assumes that the government pays amounts due on appropriations obligated before the shutdown ($512 billion), spends $225 billion on exempted military and civilian personnel, pays entitlement benefits for those found eligible before the shutdown (about $2 trillion), and pays interest costs when due ($237 billion). This is about 83 percent of projected 2014 spending of $3.6 trillion.”

Not to minimize the pain and/or inconvenience some are experiencing, but this whole ordeal has been blown up by politicians and the media.  Why are open-air attractions being blocked off?  It’s an effort to convince the public that those of us who prefer less instead of more government intervention are crazy, uncaring extremists.  It’s infuriating to say the least.

In a separate article, York shines some light on how the Republicans “stumbled” into the Obamacare fight.  This from an unnamed Republican House member:

As the congressman told the story, as August progressed — and Cruz, along with a few Senate colleagues, the Heritage Foundation, and others, ran a high-profile campaign to stir public opinion against Obamacare — the House GOP leadership was mostly unaware of what was going on. “They got surprised a little bit by the Obamacare thing,” the lawmaker said. “This was something that blew up in August. Nobody really saw it coming — probably should have a little bit, I’m not being critical of anybody in that regard, on either side of this — but it just happened.”

The result of Reid’s intransigence, coming after multiple Republican miscalculations, was that both sides dug in. Whatever chance there had been of a settlement before — and there really wasn’t much of one, once the events of August began to unfold — there was zero possibility of a deal as September 30 approached. So the shutdown that House leadership never expected came. And it lasted more than the few days some predicted. And it is still going on as the October 17 deadline for raising the nation’s debt ceiling approaches. The crisis that House Republican leaders didn’t see coming is now consuming them, with unpredictable consequences. “We’re not in a situation that has been planned out and war-gamed and plotted, OK?” said the congressman. “We stumbled into a situation like Gettysburg that nobody planned, and all of a sudden each side is feeding more troops into it, and it’s turning into a much bigger deal.”

In a way, all this, if true, is a little scary.  However, it’s refreshing to know that not everything that goes on in Washington is a made-for-TV drama that’s been poll-tested over and over again.  I believe there’s certainly a theater element to all of this, but hopefully there are some standing on principle, fighting against conventional political wisdom.

Hat Tip:  Drudge Report

Awful Blogger

Posted in Conservatism, Politics with tags , , , , on May 22, 2010 by Cannon

Yep, that’s me. It’s like I’ve fallen off the face of the blogging earth. Luckily, I don’t have a ton of fans to disappoint. I must do better. I blog about as often as Eric Holder (a.k.a. Stedman) reads the legislation he criticizes. I heard someone on TV saying today that if Alberto Gonzalez had done such a thing he’d be labeled a stooge. So true.

What about Richard Blumenthal? Though he has caught some flack from leftist media types, he would have been drawn and quartered if he were a conservative. Republicans really don’t have it together yet, though. They let John Murtha’s old seat slip through their hands. It seems the public is breaking right so to speak. All Republicans have to do is be coherent and tenacious. In other words, they have to do a better job campaigning in November than I’ve done at blogging as of late. And that my friends is not a huge hurdle to clear.

Sticking With the Paul Ryan/Health Care Theme

Posted in Economy, Health Care, Politics with tags , , , , on March 22, 2010 by Cannon

Here are some new comments from Congressman Ryan via National Review Online:

“We need to establish a set of metrics and benchmarks to measure the sector going forward, keeping a close eye on all of the Democrats’ claims,” Ryan says. “From cost to quality, we will need to be vigilant in making sure that their assertions are actually substantiated with facts, and I have every reason to believe they won’t be.” Repealing Obamacare should be the goal, he says, “but with the political plurality you need to do that — a new president, 60 senators, and a majority in the House — that is a pretty tall order.”

“Our offense will be hammering them for wrecking the health-care system, their demonization of the insurance companies, and their push for government control. That is the future fight,” Ryan predicts. “They’ve got a president here until 2013 and the votes in the Senate to support this for a few years, but it’s not over. As we work to repeal, we must recognize that we’re fighting a different and distorted progressivism. They want to hook people up to entitlements and delegate more power to unelected bureaucrats and technocrats to micromanage the economy — a government full of Peter Orzags. Yet their fatal conceit is also a rational gamble to establish a new culture of dependency.”

Obviously, I’m on board with all of this.  I’m happy to see that Ryan and I are on the same page, but that’s really no surprise.  It’s just the same old thing out of the “progressives.”  Ironically, progress isn’t part of their plan.  It’s important that all those who cringe at these types of government power grabs stay in the game, and prove, in the end, that this is not the course our great country should take.  There are ways to achieve real progress without an oppressive federal government actively involved in making personal decisions for its citizens.  Another state-sponsored Ponzi scheme will fail to yield the results which Democrats claim.  It’s now time to prove that this unfortunate piece of legislation was, in fact, a mistake.  Though many types of manipulation were utilized to sugarcoat Obamacare for the public, the truth is all that will be needed to bring it down.

Paul Ryan’s Health Care Alternative

Posted in Health Care, Politics with tags , , , on March 21, 2010 by Cannon

One of the rallying cries utilized by the Democrats has been that the Republican Party in is “the party of no.”  Certainly, this is correct when discussing the ruling party’s current health care plan.  But to say that Republican’s have offered no alternatives is factually incorrect.  Paul Ryan has worked, over the course of several years, on an alternative.  A short summary is available here.  There are links to more health care information at Ryan’s site.  I’ve become a fan of Ryan’s.  I intend to read more of the congressman’s work.

Though it looks like the Democrats are going to get the current bill through the House (Bart Stupak and others jumping on board as I write), they can’t sincerely say that it’s the only plan.  Democrats still have more to do to transform the bill to law.  We’ll see what happens.  Paul Ryan’s plan is solid and easily understood.  The addition of many moving parts isn’t necessarily a positive.  If you’ve seen Ryan in action, his tight grasp of the issues, especially ones concerning the budget, is obvious.  He’s the guy that Democrats don’t want to debate.

My opinion is that the Democrat plan is a huge mistake fiscally, and it will likely damage what works in our current health care system.  Despite what some liberal “strategists” are saying, the party looks to be in big trouble come election time.  It’s difficult to get the bulk of the American public to agree on much of anything, but Democrats have achieved public consensus in terms of health care.  The public’s disdain for their health care reform is quite apparent.

Health Care Debate: Liberal Extremists Vs. Local Constituencies

Posted in Health Care with tags , , , , , , , on October 14, 2009 by Cannon

Olympia Snowe went against the Republican grain in deciding to support the “Baucus bill,” but Joe Lieberman, once a Democratic Party vice presidential candidate, is making another stand against the left-wing extremists leading the Democrats.  Kim Strassel gives her take:

If Mr. Lieberman doesn’t like the bill now, he’s likely to be even less happy after Majority Leader Harry Reid has combined it with Sen. Chris Dodd’s more liberal product. Mr. Lieberman is on record opposing a “public option,” which remains the chief desire of Senate liberals.

A Lieberman defection on ObamaCare would, of course, send the Netroots around the bend — those ultra liberal activists who agitated successfully for his defeat in the 2006 Connecticut Democratic primary. But Mr. Lieberman, having faced them down to win reelection in the general election, doesn’t seem to much care about their displeasure anymore. Worse for his party’s liberals, his stance might prove an attractive example to many swing-state Democrats who still aren’t sure they want to support such a big government takeover of health-care.

The real battle isn’t Republicans vs. Democrats.  It’s the true left-wingers leading the Democrats on the national stage battling against the more moderate constituencies in most congressional districts.  Though the Democrats have control of Congress and the White House, the voters who put them in those positions mostly don’t identify themselves as being “liberal.”  It appears the disconnect between the Washington political machine and most of America is becoming more pronounced as the debates over enacting  left-leaning policies such as nationalized health care and “cap and trade” heat up.